What Is Growing On My Roof? - Beacon

What Is Growing On My Roof?

A picnic under shade trees in a mossy green glade can be a pleasant interlude, but that same velvety moss can be a threat to the endurance of your roof.

Moss spores are generated during the winter months. These spores become airborne, land on roofs and other growth sites and evolve into moss.  In the summer, the moss becomes inactive and turns into a rust-colored mass. Moss can decrease the life of a shingled roof and result in expensive repairs.

Algae, Lichen and Mold Fungi

Under conditions of shade and moisture, algae, lichens, or fungi may grow. With algae and fungus, the extent of the damage may be discoloration. Algae lichen or mold fungi are easier to clean than moss and less damaging to a roof.

Animal inhabitants

Your roof can also become infested with small animals, such as rats, house mice, squirrels, and raccoons. These creatures have sharp teeth and love to gnaw. They can destroy your roof and its structure. They also deliver bacteria and viruses, constituting a health hazard for you and your family.  

Prevention

You can take preventative actions to minimize these growths. In areas with high humidity and frequent rainfall, make sure your roof gets as much sunlight as possible.

You can also install zinc or copper flashing along the peak of your roof. When rain water seeps down, the metal will dissolve and kill the moss.

Treatment

  • Scrape off thick moss and lichen with a wide plastic scraper.
  • There are now products in the market specifically for moss, lichen and algae. Use a bleaching agent or a zinc-based product (must have “zinc” in the ingredients list.).
  • After the lichen or moss dies off and loses its grip on your shingles, a low-pressure wash, aimed down the slope of the roof, will likely remove the rest of the growth.
  • Once the roof is free of moss, zinc strips or treatment with chemicals will keep it that way.

Remember, a picnic under shade trees in a mossy green glade can be a pleasant interlude, but that same velvety moss can be a threat to the endurance of your roof.

Moss spores are generated during the winter months. These spores become air-borne, land on roofs and other growth sites and evolve into moss.  In the summer, the moss becomes inactive and turns into a rust-colored mass. Moss can decrease the life of a shingled roof and result in expensive repairs.

In warm, humid conditions, certain airborne algae can grow on shingles, leaving dark stains.

Algae lichen or mold fungi are easier to clean than moss and less damaging to a roof. With algae and some fungal growth, the extent of the damage may be shingle discoloration.

Your roof can also become infested with small animals, such as rats, house mice, squirrels, and raccoons. These creatures have sharp teeth and love to gnaw. They can destroy your roof and its structure. They also deliver bacteria and viruses, constituting a health hazard for you and your family.

Aside from making a roof look unsightly, the presence of the above-mentioned elements can shorten its life. Under most circumstances, however, a trained technician can remove this threatening blight. Cleaning could even cut your energy costs because instead of allowing your roof to reflect heat, dark areas, algae and other growth absorb heat.

Contact Beacon Roof & Exterior Cleaning at 321-507-4851 or 772-267-6804. Beacon Roof & Exterior Cleaning is a company that specializes in washing and treating the roofs and exteriors of both homes and businesses.

Pressure washing and chemical cleaning are the two types of methods used to clean a dirty, stained roof. Pressure washing is used mostly for the cleaning of metal and concrete roofs.

Pressure washing involves the use of water under pressure spray to remove dirt, stains, algae, and moss from a roof.

You can trust your Beacon professional to inspect and honestly evaluate your roof’s condition. Our fully licensed and insured technicians are some of the most knowledgeable in the business and are capable of solving any roof problem.

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